Monday, April 25, 2011

I Interview Playwrights Part 344: Miranda Huba

Miranda Huba

Hometown: Ashcroft, British Columbia, Canada

Current Town: New York City

Q:  Tell me about Dirty Little Machine.

A:  Jane is first introduced to pornography at a young age when she finds a dirty novel in her parent’s house. She regards this old paperback as the single most important piece of literature in her life. In DIRTY LITTLE MACHINE, Jane decides to seek out the most degenerate, repulsive, douchebag she can find and date him- in order that she may either fulfill her deep-seated sexual fantasies OR renounce all disempowering desires and become a true feminist. DIRTY LITTLE MACHINE is an investigation of sexual relationships and intimacy in an increasingly voyeuristic culture. DIRTY LITTLE MACHINE is running May. 19th- June. 4th (Thurs-Sat) @ The Red Room, 85 East 4th St. NYC (between 2nd ave & The Bowery) Tickets available @ and more info @

Q:  What else are you working on?

A:  I'm working on remounting my one woman show, CANDY TASTES NICE about a girl who decides to auction off her virginity. I'm also writing a play about beauty workers, I use the term writing very loosely as I haven't actually written anything yet its just images in my head at this point.

Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A:  When I was about twelve years old my parents took me to London. One warm summer evening we went to see A Midsummer's Nights Dream at the outdoor Theatre in Regents Park. Outside the theatre all these people had blankets out and were enjoying picnics before the show. I remember being impressed with this, that going to the theatre was a really beautiful communal event. The show was wonderful and I remember being in awe of one of the faeries. Her hair was white and styled to look like a punk rocker. She had a huge amount of cleavage and big red circles had painted on her breasts. I don't know, why but I thought it was hilarious. This fairy has a very small part in the show, but I followed her journey completely and the next day bought a little book of Shakespeare monologues and memorized one of her speeches. I still have it memorized. Also near the end of the performance I remember it started raining. Really lightly though, it was absolutely perfect. I knew, after seeing that show, that I wanted to be in the theatre. This experience definitely speaks to the magical quality of my work, the notion that anything can happen. I'm not sure it speaks to the darkness or sexuality but it was an important moment in my journey as an artist.

Q:  If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be?

A:  Ticket prices. Not that there isn't any reasonably priced and even free theatre out there, but when I ask people why they don't go to the theatre they often cite the cost. Theatre is about community and bringing people together but if only certain people get to participate it looses its impact. Governments should provide more funding to subsidize ticket prices.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A:  Off the top of my head: Beckett, Sarah Kane, Caryl Churchill, Richard Foreman, Erik Ehn, Young Jean Lee, Elevator Repair Service, Marie Brassard, Shakespeare, Howard Barker, Mac Wellman, and all my hard working theatre friends.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you?

A:  Theatre that is necessary. It interests me when people recognize the need to deal with a certain subject matter or tell a particular story.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  Don't worry about writing a 'good play', work on developing your own voice. Once you have found your voice as a writer you can do anything, no one can stop you.

Q:  Plugs, please:

A:  Please come and see DIRTY LITTLE MACHINE: Running May. 19th- June. 4th (Thurs-Sat) @ The Red Room, 85 East 4th St. NYC (between 2nd ave & The Bowery) Tickets available @ and more info @

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