Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Events and Productions

First of all, did you see this interview Rob Weinert-Kendt did of me at American Theatre? I get interviewed sometimes too.

UPCOMING EVENT:

Book Signing at Drama Book Shop in New York!

March 27

Scenes from plays by Crystal Skillman, Qui Nguyen and me.  You should come.



More information here


UPCOMING PRODUCTIONS of My Plays--

Clown Bar

Production #5 of Clown Bar
Indiana Players
Indiana, PA
Opens March 20, 2015


Hearts Like Fists




Production #13 of Hearts Like Fists
Outcry Theatre
Dallas, TX
Opens March 19, 2015



Production #14
Know Theatre of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, OH
Opens March 27, 2015

Production #15
Stephens College
Columbia, MO
Opens April 9, 2015

Production #16
Clark University
Worcester, MA
Opens April 15, 2015


Production #8 of Pretty Theft
City College of New York
NYC, NY
Opens February 26, 2015

Production #9 
Western Illinois University
Macomb, IL
Opens May 10, 2015


Adventures Of Super Margaret

Production #1
Oddfellows Playhouse
Middletown, CT
Opens May 28, 2015.

Nerve

Production #17 of Nerve
DePaul University
Chicago, IL
Opens June 5, 2015

New Play (TBD) 
Workshop production
Chance Theater
Anaheim, CA
August 19, 22, 23

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Support The Blog
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mailing list to be invited to Adam's events
Email:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Books by Adam (Amazon)

Friday, February 20, 2015

I Interview Playwrights Part 720: Jennifer Schlueter



Jennifer Schlueter

Hometown: St. Louis, MO

Current Town: Columbus, OH

Q:  Tell me about your upcoming show with Available Light.

A:  Last year, Matt Slaybaugh--their fabulous artistic director--approached me about doing what he was calling a "radical adaptation" of Don Quixote. I had never read the book all the way through, but its scope and ambition and sheer weirdness really turned me on. I really wanted to hang on to the book's shaggy, expansive structure and especially its metafictional playfulness--Cervantes invented a false author who narrates the book, and in its second half, the central characters are totally aware of the fact that they've been written about. Anyway, after a few months of small-scale experiments with AVLT's ensemble across the fall, I went away and built a play that is a splintering of Cervantes' massive novel, remixed with a bunch of writing about pilgrimage, exile, and walking more generally. It's called Don Quixote: A Pilgrimage, and its central plot follows a woman, Isabel (named for Cervantes' illegitimate daughter) in her present-day journey along the Camino de Santiago. I've been saying that the play examines the power of pilgrimage, how we get lost, and how, though storytelling, we can find ourselves again. We've just started rehearsals and it's been so great to watch AVLT's whip-smart ensemble just dig in.

Q:  What else are you working on now?

A:  I'm heading in to a four week residency with my play, Patience Worth, created for the for/word company. At the turn of the twentieth century, a real woman named Pearl Curran got very into the Ouija board and eventually discovered? decided? that a spirit named Patience Worth was speaking through her. Patience Worth didn't want to tell the future or contact people who had died or other standard seance-ish stuff, though...she wanted to write novels and plays and books. And so that's what Pearl did for her: she stood at a Ouija board and spelled her books out, letter by letter and word by word. To the tune of more than four million words. And Pearl's husband transcribed it all. And they published a lot of it. And then a newspaperman started hanging around...and he fell in love with Patience. And Patience declared that she wanted to be a mother and so Pearl adopted a baby for her. The whole tale is a perfect example of how truth is stranger than fiction, and the play is really about a sublimated desire for fame and the limits of credulity. It's built entirely out of stuff written by Patience/Pearl and stuff written about them in newspapers and other studies.

The play's already had a staged reading at Tristan Bates in London. In this residency, we'll be working in the Motion Lab at the Advanced Center for Computing Design. With Vita Berezina-Blackburn, their Animation Specialist, Christina Ritter (my joint artistic director) and I are going to find out what kind of projected visual environment might work for this piece. The grant language said that we're trying to find out how things like motion capture (of the body and the face) can amplify the remixed aesthetic of my work. I don't know. We're going to get some dancers in some mocap suits and see what we find out.

I'm also working on a commissioned adaptation of my play, North, for BBC Radio 4, and an adaptation of Dorothy Parker's only play, Coast of Illyria.

Q:  If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be?

A:  The terrible habit of thinking of New York as the center of it all. It's not.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A:  For showing me that scavenging and pillaging and remixing were a viable way in: Chuck Mee and Emily Mann. For thinking really seriously about why and how teaching playwriting matters: Paula Vogel and Michael Bigelow Dixon. For making it happen for other people: Ellen Stewart and Margo Jones.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you?

A:  The kind of theater where the lyrical mixes with the profane. Gritty and smart and sweaty and fun. And ensemble-driven stuff from folks like the Rude Mechs and Frantic Assembly. And everything created by my students.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  Don't wait for permission or until you know enough or until you deserve it. If you do, you are insulated from the failures that you will learn from, protected from the risks you must take. Jump before you think you're ready. Make work. Produce yourself. Don't wait.

Q:  Plugs, please:

A few great reasons to think beyond New York:
  • Young Writers Short Play Festival, Madlab Theatre, Columbus, Ohio, July 10-25, 2015, http://www.madlab.net/MadLab/youngguide.html  One of the smartest young writer programs I've encountered--real mentorship, workshops, developmental readings, and full productions with professional actors.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Support The Blog
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mailing list to be invited to Adam's events
Email:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Books by Adam (Amazon)

4 One Minute Plays

Below are 2 one minute plays I wrote for the NY Indie One Minute Play Festival.  And here are the two I posted the last time I did this--the Primary Stages one from last year.

OUR RELATIONSHIP

By Adam Szymkowicz

(TWO PEOPLE one in front of the other, in line, waiting. J and Q enter and reach the end of the line at the same moment. They both motion for the other to go.)

Q
You were here first.

J
No, you.

Q
You go. Please.

J
I insist.

Q
No.

J
I insist.

Q
Well okay.

J
Do I… Do I know you?

Q
No. No? No.

J
You're on the Internet?

Q
Yes.

J
We hate each other.

Q
Yes.





THE CHEESE

By Adam Szymkowicz

(SUE and BETSY seated.)

SUE
I just can’t any more.

BETSY
Oh right. Because of everything.

SUE
I feel like I don’t want to read anything or see anything or experience anything because if I like it, the week after someone will write an article telling me how my experience is wrong and I shouldn’t like it because—

BETSY
I know.

SUE
We could. I dunno. You wanna. Like drop out?

BETSY
Nah. I’d miss the cheese.

SUE
Yeah.

BETSY
The cheese.

(They think about the cheese.)

SUE
Okay so just to be clear… is this a date?

BETSY
Oh. No. I mean. No. Except. Okay. Maybe. I don’t like girls, but okay, yes. Yes. But we’re not dropping out though?

SUE
No.

BETSY
Okay.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Support The Blog
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mailing list to be invited to Adam's events
Email:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Books by Adam (Amazon)

Friday, February 13, 2015

I Interview Playwrights Part 719: Edmond Malin


Edmond Malin

Hometown: Park Ridge, NJ

Current Town: Brooklyn, NY

Q:  Tell me about your upcoming shows.

A:  “The Addicts” will run April 16-May 3 at Theater For The New City. In this play, the Jewish Supporters of Christ try out their new marketing approach on the Black Hebrew Israelite community just to be inclusive. During his door-to-door missionary work, Stephen Zuckerman meets Isaac Rabinowitz, only they originally met in college and may still have feelings for each other. Canada, still paranoid since the Cold War began there in 1945, finally becomes a belligerent superpower while the USA chills out. Why do people (and empires) go from one addictive behavior to another?
In addition, “Generic Magic Realism”, a show I wrote for which Nat Cassidy received a 2013 New York Innovative Theatre Award nomination for Outstanding Solo Performance, will return this Fall in the United Solo Festival.

Q:  What else are you working on now?

A:  “Inversion of the Baby Snatchers” shows us the lives of unemployed computer programmers, whose jobs have gone to the parallel world of India. In both worlds, of course, there is a Star Trek fan club, with similar folks (Roger and Herman vs. Raju and Hemanth). They find they can help each other stop trafficking of adoptable babies, all thanks to the innumerable contributions of India to mathematics.

Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A:  I grew up on the Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy radio series and playing jazz. That was the beginning of my trying to write plays of any kind with strong dialogue and a sense of comic timing.

Q:  If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be?

A:  I love observing, participating in and reviewing for festivals like FringeNYC, Planet Connections, United Solo and Frigid. Keeping such festivals all around the world going strong gives artists a chance to develop and tour their work, and make alliances. More, longer and more amazing festivals, please. Maybe even in New Jersey.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A:  I like Tom Stoppard, Tony Kushner, Caryl Churchill, Mac Wellman, Moliere, Gilbert & Sullivan, Danny Kaye.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you?

A:  I don’t want to be comfortable. Theater can brings up issues that a well-mannered person’s brain tries to ignore. Theater can have no words, or no distinguishable characters, or can merge all sorts of art forms.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  Be yourself and keep writing about what interests you.

Q:  Plugs, please:

A:  Please see my group Temerity Theatre on Facebook and at www.Temeritytheatre.org. Please, please patronize Indietheaternow, which was kind enough to include my play “Óscar Tango-Bravo” in the “Plays and Playwrights 2015” anthology.

 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Support The Blog
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mailing list to be invited to Adam's events
Email:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Books by Adam (Amazon)

Monday, February 09, 2015

I Interview Playwrights Part 718: Donna Hoke



Donna Hoke

Hometown: Cheektowaga, NY (near Buffalo, NY)

Current Town: East Amherst, NY (near Buffalo), by way of 17 years in New Jersey

Q:  What are you working on now?

A:  A lot of marketing! I have four unproduced plays that were the result of a prolific period. ON THE ROOF is a 1950s play set in a gay bar (with a few songs because it's a cabaret) that has a reading at Buffalo United Artists May 3; BRILLIANT WORKS OF ART is about a sugar baby and has been well-workshopped; THE WAY IT IS is a long one-act with a unique take on date rape; and CHRISTMAS 2.0 is a comedy that I'm going to be workshopping at the Hormel Festival of New Works in Phoenix in March. Writing-wise, I'm reading tons of books by one author for an adaptation collaboration, and another for a new play that will address mental illness in a way. During research phases, I write ten-minute plays, so I have a couple new ones that I'm sending out. And behind the scenes, I'm prepping for BUA Takes 10, a GLBT ten-minute play festival that I founded and co-curate, and which opens its third year March 27, and reading scripts for the NYS Roving Readings Series that I run with the Central New York regional rep for the Dramatists Guild (I'm WNY).

Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A:  I have two quick ones. My mother's favorite: When I was three, she used to put me in the nursery at the bowling alley on her league day. One day, the lights went out in the whole building during snack time; while all the kids were freaking out crying for their mothers, I apparently made my way around in the dark and ate their cookies. I'll call that quick thinking and independence :) The other is from third or fourth grade, when I was in charge of the classroom newspaper. On the front page, I put a riddle, "Q: Why shouldn't you eat Green Giant vegetables? A: Because the Jolly Green Giant is always standing over the fields and he has to go to the bathroom some time." I thought it was funny; my teacher didn't. She covered it with tape and when the copies were made, there was a big white hole on the front page. It looked ugly; I still don't like holes.

Q:  If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be? 

A:  Every theater would commit to one new play per season--first, second, or third production. That's not enough to scare off subscribers, but imagine what it would do to the new play sector!

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes? 

A: Playwrights who write and write and write and and pound the virtual and literal pavement to get their work noticed, small theaters who do new work even though it's a risk because they know it's important, and the people at the Dramatists Guild--for starters.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you? 

A:  New plays. I can appreciate a well-done classic--I'm crushing on Arthur Miller lately after seeing a great VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE and killer DEATH OF A SALESMAN--but I'm not one to choose a revival (no matter who's in it!) over something new by a contemporary playwright.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  1) Write the second play. After I wrote my first, my boyfriend said, “I can’t wait to see what kind of body of work you end up with.” And I was like, “Body of work? What’s wrong with THIS play?” lol He’s a musician, so he saw the big picture; you have to practice and practice and practice and practice. Writing is no different. I’ve heard people say it takes ten years to make a dent as a playwright. A dent. So if you don’t love it enough to write a second play, and a third, and a fourth, ad infinitum, then it’s going to get discouraging very fast. 2) Learn to write the best plays you can, through how-to books, workshops, conferences, and seeing and reading as many plays as possible. 3) Get involved--online, with local theaters, in playwright groups. The more you know, the more you know, and the more you do, the more people you'll meet. 4) Listen to smart people when they talk to you about your work. 5) Submit, submit, submit.

Q:  Plugs, please: 

A:  I'll plug the Real Inspiration for Playwrights Project (RIPP) on my blog at blog.donnahoke.com. Fifty-two entries of inspirational stories and advice about submission and getting productions from generous literary managers and artistic directors across the country. You'll also find TAPT--TRADE A PLAY TUESDAY--at my blog, which is a playwright-driven weekly resource for getting much needed feedback on ten-minute plays; you can find the guidelines in the TAPT category, so jump in! Play-wise, I'll plug two things that are happening this year: THE COUPLE NEXT DOOR opens April 11 at Dangerous Theatre in Denver; it's a cool cabaret space and should be a lot of fun; this play is in its second year in rep in Romania. Then May 16 at 2:00 at the Center at Halsted in Chicago, SAFE, my finalist in the Great Gay Play and Musical Contest, will get an enhanced reading before the winner is determined. This play, which is about the mother of a bully, has gotten a lot of attention and two awards in the past year, and is part of a program that gives SAFE a university production this fall intended as development for a subsequent world premiere, so I want to spread the word about it.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Support The Blog
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mailing list to be invited to Adam's events
Email:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Books by Adam (Amazon)


Friday, February 06, 2015

Save The Date

Two Cool Cats and me are doing a book signing at Drama Book Shop in NYC of our new Sam French titles.

The Particulars:

Fri March 27
5-6 performances downstairs
6-later signing upstairs




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Support The Blog
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mailing list to be invited to Adam's events
Email:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Books by Adam (Amazon)

Sunday, February 01, 2015

I Interview Playwrights Part 717: Yasmine Lever


Yasmine Lever

Hometown: London, England.

Current Town: New York NY, London England

Q: What are you working on now?

A: I just workshopped my new play Land Of Broken Toys at The Flea last week so I am about to delve into the next draft. Also a short play I wrote Devil is being turned into a film. And I am completing my Young Adult novel Crush set in riots in contemporary London.

Q: Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A: I grew up in a family with a ton of secrets where the public image was very different from what was going on behind closed doors. As a result I developed a rich fantasy life as well as a huge desire to express unspoken truths. I think both these traits are important for a writer. In terms of pinpointing a specific incident I think I would choose getting kicked out of home very young. Because none of my school friends shared this experience I think I felt a need to record my thoughts furiously in journals. Sadly I lost them all because I bounced around so many places.

Q: If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be?

A: Ticket prices. I divide my time fairly evenly between London and New York. In London ticket prices are so much cheaper, which means that there are younger audiences in many of the theaters. This obviously effects the range of plays that then get produced.

Q: Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A: Cindy Lou Johnson. Where did she go? She wrote The Person I Once Was, Brilliant Traces, and The Years. Then she seemed to disappear. I‘m also a huge fan of Tennessee Williams. Other plays that I have adored are Angels In America by Tony Kushner, Long Days Journey Into Night, Eugene O'Neill, That Face by Polly Stenham, Spur of The Moment Anya Rice.

Q: What kind of theater excites you? 

A:  Writers with a unique voice and a unique way of telling a story coupled with directors with a unique vision and an exciting way of staging the writer’s work, coupled with charismatic actors with intelligence and depth of feeling able to bring these tales fully alive in the moment. I’m easy to please clearly:)

Q: What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out? 

A:  Trust yourself. Don’t listen to people who tell you how it has to be done. Learn the rules then break them for a reason if you need to and don’t listen to people who tell you that you can’t.

Q: Plugs, please: 

A:  I write a blog on Crazytown which now comes out on Fridays. And look out for a new series of plays called The Other Broadway. I think the first night will be some time in March.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Support The Blog
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mailing list to be invited to Adam's events
Email:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Books by Adam (Amazon)

Friday, January 30, 2015

I Interview Playwrights Part 716: David Hilder


David Hilder

Hometown: Vienna, VA

Current Town: New York NY

Q:  What are you working on now? 

A:   I'm actually in the middle of my MFA thesis workshop production at Hunter College as I write this -- that play is called The Moment Before it All Went Wrong. This spring I will continue to refine and complete drafts of three other plays, including an adaptation of Kafka's The Trial in the style of a caper comedy (I call it Just Try!), and a new piece that's really rough called Eight Near-Death Experiences. The best thing about grad school has definitely been the massive amount of writing I've gotten done because there has been an external source demanding that I do it.

Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person. 

A:   Wow, that's a really interesting question. Well, okay, when I was a kid, my father was in the Navy -- he was a 30-year career Naval officer -- so we moved every few years or so. At one point, that meant I went to four schools in three years (started 7th grade in Texas, finished it in Virginia, went to a magnet school thing for 8th grade, and then went to high school). I think those things contributed to my learning to be funny, because I had to make friends quickly. In a way, a military childhood is the perfect training ground for a life in theatre, where you're constantly meeting and bonding with new people and then detaching; some stay in your life, most don't, and that's okay.

Q:  If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be? 

A:  I wish I could figure out how to make theatre something young people were dying to attend -- more than movies/TV/Netflix/screen-based whatever. I'm not sure that answers the question, but that's on my mind a lot.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes? 

A:   Tony Kushner just amazes the living bejesus out of me, because his plays are so ferociously intelligent without skimping on emotional content and connection. And I am always interested in Brecht's plays, because despite the fact that he was aiming to distance the audience from the play, the stories are unfailingly moving to me.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you? 

A:   It sounds kind of fundamental, but I really like plays with strong characters who relate to each other and have big wants. I also love plays with story, rather than purely experiential pieces.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out? 

A:   Don't get hung up on your first play. It might be genius, but it might also be a step you need to take to get to your next (better) play. And the one after that. And the one after that. So listen, learn, revise and refine, but don't forget to move forward also.

Q:  Plugs, please: 

A:  My play Drown will be produced by Acadiana Repertory Theatre in Lafayette, LA in September, and I can't wait to see it in production.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Support The Blog
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mailing list to be invited to Adam's events
Email:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Books by Adam (Amazon)

Friday, January 16, 2015

Hi Playwrights, Dramaturgs, Directors, Play Readers, Producers, Actors


Do you know about the New Play Exchange?  It launched yesterday.  It is a database of new plays.  Should you be looking for plays to produce or just plays to read, it is a very cool thing.

Read more about it here in this article.

Here is a link to my profile where you can read some of my newer (not yet published) plays as well as links to my published plays.  (I'm pretty sure you have to register to do so, however.)

Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You



Support The Blog Or Support The Art




Mailing list to be invited to readings, productions, and events
Email:


Books by Adam

Monday, January 12, 2015

I Interview Playwrights Part 715: Tom Dulack


Tom Dulack

Hometown:  I was born and raised in Whiting, Indiana, and graduated with a B.A. in English from Indiana University in 1957. I got an M.A. in English at the University in Connecticut in 1959. I am now full professor of English at UConn where I teach courses in Shakespeare, Hemingway and theatre-related subjects.

Current Town:  I live in Bridgewater, Connecticut with my wife, Veronique who is a Belgian art historian and who also teaches at UConn.

Q:  Tell me about The Road To Damascus.

A:  I wrote the first draft of The Road to Damascus in 2007 fueled by my anger over the Bush-Cheney-Rumsfeld war crimes. At first there was a lot of interest, we did a reading upstairs at Sardi's in front of a rather large audience and for a while everyone was excited. A guy in Brussels commissioned a French translation with the idea of doing it there at the National Theatre where I had a play performed in the 1980s. There were expressions of interest from London. Then Obama was elected and somehow the first black president seemed to take the steam out of the idea of a play about the first black pope. No one saw that in a few short years, our middle east policies under Obama would be as horrible as what we endured under Bush-Cheney-Rumsfeld. And suddenly, with Assad gassing his own people, the same play had new life and momentum. A compelling example of life imitating art.

The Road to Damascus imagines a world in the near future in which Syria continues to be a cauldron of violence, and a breeding ground of terrorists that all claim descent from ISIS of 2015. Same gangs of fanatics with different names. The U.S. is bent on wiping Syria off the face of the earth once and for all using a terror bombing in New York as a cover even though Washington knows that the funding of the gang that attacked New York has nothing to do with Damascus. An obvious parallel with Bush-Cheney-Rusmfeld using 9/11 as an excuse to attack Iraq even though they knew Iraq had nothing to do with 9/11. The new (since 3 months) Pope Augustine, who comes out of the Congo, decides to intervene to prevent the United States from bombing Damascus. This creates an immense rapidly escalating crisis that takes place in back and forth scenes between Washington and the Vatican.

Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A:  I was raised like many writers and artists as a Roman Catholic. I no longer practice but I continue to write often on religious subjects. The hypocrisies of the RC hierarchy have always particularly fascinated me, and I loved the creative possibilities of imagining what an African pope would be like.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A:  When I was a kid I could not get enough of George Bernard Shaw. I still read him all the time, especially his criticism. His stuff on Shakespeare has no equal. But I am a playwright today probably because of John Osborne's Inadmissible Evidence. I had tickets to see it on Broadway with Nichol Williamson. It was a matinee and Williamson was sick and an actor named James Patterson played Maitland and the play changed my life. Until then I had been a novelist, and had enjoyed some success with a couple of books, but after seeing Inadmissible Evidence all I wanted to do was to write plays like that. I also became good friends with Patterson. He was the first and has remained since then the only actor I ever wrote a fan letter to and he wrote back immediately and we were friends until he died alas way too young. Later his wife Rochelle Oliver starred in my first commercially produced play, Solomon's Child, at the Long Wharf in New Haven but not, unfortunately, in its Broadway transfer.

Q:  What else are you working on now?

A:  Since 2005 I have been writing short scripts and casting and directing them as part of the New York Philharmonic/s Young Persons Concerts series. I've written almost 40 of them, more than anyone other than Lenny Bernstein as it happens, and four times a year I get to do my stuff at Avery Fisher Hall in front of 2700 people. We have been sold out for these concerts since I arrived. No doubt a coincidence. Anyway, I have two more of those to do this spring. I am looking to place a new kind of music drama about Vivaldi I've written, to be performed with a symphony orchestra so if any symphony orchestras are reading this, I have something terrific for you. Also a new play, there's always a new play, this one about Aphra Behn, the first and best female professional playwright in England, a kind of feminist thing that features a friend of Aphra's and Nell Gwynn who turns out to be Virgina Woolf. This is in an early stage of first draft and came out of a sketch I wrote for a NY Phil YPC about Aphra Behn that was memorably portrayed by the ineffable dancer/actress Heather Lipson Bell and fortunately captured on a video which has yet to be released.

I am also looking for a producer for a film I wrote about the tragic (yet comical) marriage of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Lizzie Siddal, so if any movie producers are reading this...

And I'm putting the finishing touches on a book about an extraordinary priest who taught me in grammar school and to whom I believe I owe nearly all of what turned out to be my cultural life. I owe him an extraordinary debt. He was my first hero. He was also a pederast.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  Sign up for some classes or workshops in acting. Get up there on a stage and learn what theatre is all about. You can't learn from sitting at a desk writing. I wrote a lot of plays before I was 30, or what I thought were plays. But it was the late William Gibson in Stockbridge who saw one of these things and advised me to come up there and take some acting lessons. I did, and as soon as I began to act (badly, I hasten to add) I started getting my plays produced. Acting showed me what a scene was all about, how to write for actors, how to write plays.

Q:  Plugs, please:

A:  The Road to Damascus runs at 59E59 Theaters from January 17 - March 1. http://www.59e59.org/moreinfo.php?showid=190


Enter Your Email To Have New Blog Posts Sent To You



Support The Blog Or Support The Art




Mailing list to be invited to readings, productions, and events
Email:


Books by Adam