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1000 PLAYWRIGHT INTERVIEWS

1000 Playwright Interviews The first interview I posted was on June 3, 2009.  It was Jimmy Comtois.  I decided I would start interview...

Dec 14, 2018

I Interview Playwrights Part 1019: Malcolm Tariq


Malcolm Tariq

Hometown: Savannah, Georgia

Current Town: Brooklyn, New York

Q:  What are you working on now?

A:  Right now, I’m doing edits for a book of poems, Heed the Hollow (Graywolf Press, 2019), that will be published in November. The collection won the 2018 Cave Canem Poetry Prize, which is an absolute dream. We just chose the cover and the process is slowly making everything more and more real. I’m so thankful to have a supportive publishing team and, of course, Cave Canem.

When I’m done with edits in a month or two, I’ll go back to working on plays. Currently thinking about magical realism (whatever that means), AIDS, slavery, and the South(s). Always the South(s). I have a few ideas, but nothing concrete. Meanwhile, I wait.

Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A:  When I was very young, my mother worked at a hair salon on Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in Savannah. There was an empty lot next door. One day when I was visiting the salon, I made some sort of house out of scraps, litter, and other things I found in the lot. At the time I thought it was a huge house, but that was most likely not the case. I expected the house to be there the next time I drove past. It was not. Perhaps all of my writing is a response to this intersecting expectation and destruction.

Another time, I turned my room into an art gallery with images I drew on the backs of pieces of cardboard. This is something I still do, though with better art and more visitors.

Q:  If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be?

A:  I wish more people bought and read contemporary plays. This is probably isn’t exclusively a theater issue, but a reading and a commercial issue in the United States. Long before I saw plays performed I read them. Teachers and school districts should diversify the plays they assign in schools. This is how we get more people interested in wanting to go and engage with theater. This is how we bring theatre to places where there is no theater to go to. This is how we support playwrights.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A:  My first theatre heroes are my family. My grandmother had eight children, and all of them have children. I grew up with lots of cousins in the same neighborhood that my mother did. Living in a black working-class community was where I first learned how to tell compelling stories. Voice. Humor. Signifying. High drama. Then I found Suzan Lori Parks. Reading Topdog/Underdog made me realize that there was possibility in theatre, there was no necessary form that I had to follow.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you?

A:  I love a good story that plays with history and form in unsuspecting ways but still delivers dramatic characterization. I love that spellbinding moment that’s supposed to get people fixed into a zone or make them cry. I’m the weird person in the back row looking at all faces in the audience, smiling.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  Find whatever journey your writing is taking you on and ground yourself there. But always be prepared to venture down the unexpected. I went into college expecting to study creative writing. I studied literature instead, and spent four years barely writing. Afterwards, I had more personal direction and purpose. The writing was much more intentional.

I usually find that a healthy balance of living and writing works for me.

1. Live:

Read. Study. Listen. Read the newspaper. Study your family history. Listen to music from your childhood. Read something from a genre you aren’t familiar with. Study something you think you are familiar with. Listen for what isn’t being said when something’s being said. Read something suggested by a friend. Study a foreign concept (go to a random library shelf and draw a random book). Listen to the way you respond to those around you. Read a biography of someone you don’t like. Study craft (read interviews and essays of your favorite writers). Listen to conversations around you (write these down).

2. Write:

First some imitation, then creation. Know the rules (if you must) and break them (if you want). Know why you are doing this. Read books you are in conversation with. Study the world around that conversation. Listen to what your writing/philosophy is saying to you and the world (these may be different).

Q:  Plugs, please:

A:  Remember to check back in on the book late summer 2019 for preorders. I have poems from the project coming out in the forthcoming issues of The Iowa Review, Connotation Press, Washington Square Review, and American Poetry Review.

My play, Social Work, will be part of the Brave New Works 2019: Ditmas Park reading series by Brave New Worlds Repertory Theatre on March 23, 2019. This is my first public reading in New York City so I’m very excited.

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Nov 29, 2018

UPCOMING PRODUCTIONS OF MY PLAYS

PRODUCTIONS

WORLD PREMIERE

Stockholm Syndrome
or Remember That Time Jimmy's All American Beefsteak Place Was Taken Over By That Group Of Radicals?

Production #1 of Stockholm Syndrome
The NOLA Project
New Orleans, LA
Opens January 2019.


MORE SHOWS

KODACHROME

Production #7 of Kodachrome
Fire Exit Theatre
Alberta, Canada
Opens November 28, 2018.


Production #8 of Kodachrome
Actors Bridge Ensemble
Nashville, TN
Opens July 12, 2019.

Marian or The True Tale of Robin Hood

Production #16 of Marian
Theatre Conspiracy
Fort Myers, FL
Opens February 7, 2019.

Production #17 of Marian
University of North Carolina
Wilmington, NC
Opens February 21, 2019.

Production #18 of Marian
Shakespeare Performance Troupe
Bryn Mawr College
Bryn Mawr, PA.
Opens March 28, 2019.

Production #19 of Marian
Regis College
Weston, MA
Opens April 11, 2019.

Incendiary

Production #3 of Incendiary
Farmington Valley Stage Company
Collinsville, CT
Opens January 25, 2019.

7 Ways To Say I Love You
a night of short plays

Production #26 of 7 Ways
American School of Doha
Doha, Qatar
Opens January 30, 2019.

Production #27 of 7 Ways
Northern Illinois University School Of Theatre And Dance
Dekalb, IL
Opens March 20, 2019.

Production #28 of 7 Ways
Ursula Franklin Academy
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Opens April 20, 2019.

Production #29 of 7 Ways
Auburn Community Players
Fiskdale, MA
Opens July 12, 2019.


Production #41 of HLF
Anchorage, AK
Opens Sept 19, 2019

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Nov 27, 2018

I Interview Playwrights Part 1018: Ren Dara Santiago





Ren Dara Santiago

Hometown:  I was born in the Bronx, lived in Puerto Rico for the first year of my life. Then Yonkers. We moved to Harlem in 2002.

Current Town:  Harlem. I am re-experiencing it now with my roommates: one a devout James Baldwin-head, Alexander Lambie and the other is my future president, Cesar J Rosado who buys me bacalaito on 116. They’re both gorgeous actors I came up with.

Q:  Congrats on winning the Cornelia Street American Playwriting Award. Can you tell me about that?

A:  Absolutely. It’s a huge honor. I haven’t fully realized the scope of it, I’m sure. I can’t say enough about the depth of love, confidence, and trust I feel being bestowed upon me as the inaugural recipient of this award from Rising Phoenix Rep, honoring the spirit and legacy of Joe Cino. So, one of the members who chose me for this award is Daniel. I met Daniel as a teenager. Lucy was like, “my brother saw your play,” and I was like, “oh shit.” He’d come to see a workshop production of COME TO STARR STREET and it excited him. His confidence gives me faith in myself. Then I acted in a play written by Catya McMullen for Cino Nights, directed by Jenna Worsham. And he gave me and a few fam a Shakespeare workshop at Belvedere Castle. Then he directed the shit out of The Siblings Play in PlayLabs at MCC. He let me rewrite the play twice that week. And the Talbott’s put me up when I got in to Ojai Playwrights Conference. He and Addie have become these beautiful guides for truth and love in the theater. It’s an honor that they chose me. I’m burning with the desire to live up to this legacy and uphold the honor and integrity that the members of Rising Phoenix Rep holistically embody in all facets of themselves. There’s going to be a ceremony in February at Rattlestick. At Rattlestick; where Daniel was mentored by David Van Asselt; who asked Lucy to start an apprentice company; who invited a handful of her former MCC Youth Company students into and we called it The Middle Voice; that’s our family home. I am in awe of how romantic my life is at this moment. I am in awe of the people surrounding me and I can’t wait for us to rise together, building each other up. I recognize the ways in which I am continually lifted and I live to pay that forward and make my theater family proud.

Q:  What are you working on now?

A:  My Rising Phoenix Rep membership was just announced so I’m pretty hype. I’m excited for their co-pro of Jessica Dickey’s Play: The Convent coming to A.R.T/ New York Theatres. I have one or two more meetings with Playgrounds at the Lark where I’m workshopping the fantasy scenes for an educational-theater piece. I’m heading to the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center for Playwrights & Librettists at NTI and I get to do a lil exercise with them for the weekend. I’m in Middle Voice at Rattlestick and we have an exciting new theater artist running the program but until that really gets running we’ve got some development hours and I’m just feenin to stretch those producer muscles and cast some members in some plays I been reading; like I want some of my boys to tear up We Are Proud to Present A Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, from the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884-1915 so we can have some Baldwin-style discussions. I may use some hours to hear a rewrite of my play Something in the Balete Tree before Gingold Theatrical Group sets up a reading for me in the new year. I am applying to some grad programs for Playwriting which are due very soon and please cross your fingers for me because my spirit has never demanded a prize like this education. Whattup Yale?!

Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A:  So there's two parts of me that are married when I write; the spiritual and the inherited. I saw God as a kid once. My father was Rasta; he actually hung out with some Bobo Shanti in Yonkers but he couldn’t officially join them. So, God wasn’t an untouchable existence to me. When I told my grandma about my dream all my titi’s made a big deal out of it. They weren’t surprised he came to me. Later, I’d start seeing demons. Before writing the play Daniel came to see, I’d seen the devil a few times in my dreams and we began forging a deal for my soul. That play was my way out of our contract. And that’s just part of my understanding of the world... I put all that impossible shit into my plays and it helps guide me through the conversations I want to have with the people coming into my spaces. I’ve always lived in sort of adjacent realities. Like, my parents are people that don’t exist anywhere else, even within their families and I’m a product of that and in a lot of ways we grew up together. My mother is a Filipina who emigrated at 2; who dodged her inheritance to pursue a career in fashion; who didn’t marry who they expected her to; who accepted that scorn to be with my father and give birth to me and my siblings. My father is a second generation Boricua. He grew up in Cali, a total surfer brah and came to Brooklyn with an orange Mohawk talking about Dub when everybody and they mother was rocking to Big Daddy Kane and the like. My dad is a self-educated scholar. He had me read A People’s History in middle school. I grew up on indies and Japanese anime’s and ska, dub, roots reggae, System of a Down, and goth. Miyazaki’s worlds are over-layed onto my perception of nature and industry. Yeah. They never told me how to look at the world. They told me how to look at each other. Yeah. Neither of my parents fit. Anywhere. They stood out. They were loved but they didn’t fit. I found a place where I fit and where I could fulfill my potential. And my potential is making at least one difference in this short time we have. That’s kind of why I am who I am.

Q:  If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be?

A:  Laziness. I see a lot of laziness. It’s in the tiny things sometimes- not casting in honor of heritage or it’s big like letting a draft that’s mainly diary, not dialogue, make it all the way to production. The worst is laziness in watching a play. That’s the worst. How dare you praise a smart-but-easy play and scorn the ones with all the heart and soul? That might be talking about people you never met or experiences you’ve never had. Why did you come to the theater? Watching the theater should inspire community.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A:  Lucy Thurber is my hero. She’s a warrior. She’s the best teacher I’ve ever had and she loves doing it in this way that you can only experience to understand. Her plays are these endless black holes filled with her love and her brain and I love that woman. Jenna Worsham just never stops. She’s my best friend and nobody can stop her from fighting for social justice fucking everywhere she goes. Adam Bock is a genius and the funniest, kindest person I’ve ever met. And every play blows my mind. Daniel Talbott is a triple threat? Quadruple threat AND an amazing dad. And I’m in love with his characters- like I’m haunted by all of his characters. Addie Talbott is a queen and I want to be as brave, smart, and badass and genuine as her. Sam Soule is an epic Greek titan in the form a petite human. David Zheng and Cesar J Rosado are my brothers and my pride and joy. Rachel Jett running things at NTI like the boss she is. Those are the OG’s. This month I am in love with Ngozi Anyanwu, Alexander Lambie, Jordana De La Cruz, Christopher Gabriel Nunez, Julissa Contreras, Jeremy O Harris, Erika Dickerson-Despenza, TJ Weaver, Robert Lee Leng, Guadalis Del Carmen... I am forgetting some. I’m sorry. That’s just this week having me so grateful for their work.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you?

A:  Brave, unapologetic, heart-open, thoughtful, critical, deeply explored, wild, funny, real shit.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  Remember who you are writing for, so you can keep going. Write as much as you see and read. Talk to the collaborators you like, and spend a lot of time listening and learning from and trusting what you have to offer. That when you’re just getting to know artists the best way to get love is to give it freely first. That’s not a recipe that’s a religion. Save everything to the cloud or wherever before you move from where you are writing in case you spill or drop your shit and lose that draft.

Q:  Plugs, please:

A:  


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Nov 14, 2018

I Interview Playwrights Part 1017: Aladdin Ullah



Aladdin Ullah

Hometown: New York City

Current Town: New York City

Q:  Tell me about Dishwasher Dreams.

A:  It was developed at the Public Theater while I was a member of the Inaugural Emerging Writers Group. Man I really loved that group. Some super talented writers, talented artists were in that group- Ethan Lipton, Radha Blank, Raul Castillo and quite a few more. A little before that time, I was really frustrated about 15 years ago being a comedian. I was a bit burned out, comedy can be grueling. I was tired of the grind and constantly auditioning for stereotypical roles. So I saw Lackawaana Blues by Ruben Santiago Hudson and it was life altering. I cried in the lobby of the Public Theater because it was so moving, so real, I felt like a voyeur watching the humanity of that play along with the blues guitar scoring the scenes. Some solo shows are just a showcase for the actor with no story but Ruben had such a moving story. It inspired me to write my solo play Dishwasher Dreams with an amazing Tabla Player- Avi Sharma. 

The play is about me preparing to audition for the role of a Muslim terrorist as I reminisce about my dad arriving from Bangladesh to land in Spanish Harlem during the 1940's in pursuit of the American Dream. I wanted to do something original with music that was both hilarious and moving. There weren't a lot of plays that addressed immigrants from the perspective of first generation and second generation clashing, as well as addressing various themes. I think this play is a very original play. I'm trying to show the authentic voice of immigrants that are Muslim along with their children like myself who grew up right in the thick of hip hop during the late 70's and 80's. I think people have one view of Muslims. I'd like to write plays that show audiences we are more than just the cliche of caricatures you see everyday. There are folks who grew up in Muslim households that are not the stereotype, there are muslims who rebel, are defiant, some smoke weed, some practice the religion, some do not , but most of all we are human. Sometimes people forget that. I'm trying to just write stories that bring that truth, that diversity to the stage and screen with nuance. There is very anti-immigrant sentiment right now. It's actually nothing new because racism is American as apple pie. Arts is a great weapon to combat that-- especially comedy. The theater is best place to tell the truth, that kind of captivating experience is what makes me fall in love with live performance.

Q:  What else are you working on now?

A:  I'm hoping to finish my next play Halal Brothers about two brothers from Bangladesh that own a Halal store in Harlem with events taking place the day of Malcolm X's assassination in 1965. I wrote it really for Aasif Manvi who is brilliant. I'm also working on finishing editing my documentary in Search of Bengali Harlem. It's about the first wave of Bengali Muslims that arrived in Harlem from 1880's to present day.

Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A:  When I was a little kid I lived in the projects and never thought writers existed. I read a book called Down These Mean Streets by Piri Thomas. That book took place on my block on 104th street. I was fascinated that anyone who wrote about my neighborhood. When I read this book he created a vivid picture of places I walked in daily. I couldn't believe that you could write about where you lived. I was 11 years old and inspired to write. I attended the boys's club on 111th street and as fate would have it the photography teacher there knew Piri Thomas. I told him I wrote a few short stories. So he took me out to Piri Thomas' house by Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn to meet him. I was about 11 years old. I was a bit starstruck by Piri Thomas as I loved that book. It was a bit overwhelming as all these adults were there. Later in the night people were playing congas and they were reciting poetry. Piri Thomas told me to get up and read one of my stories. I kept nodding my head saying, "no, no, no!" Piri told me he would read one piece and he would be next to me and persuaded me to read my short. Piri said his piece and then I took a deep breath and read my short piece as my knees were shaking. It was about me looking out my window on 104th and Park Avenue wondering where the metro north trains were going. Were they going to a place where people didn't have to walk up 15 flights when the elevator broke? Or was it a place where people were going to get chocolate like in willa wonka world and on on and on. After I finished people were cheering and Piri bear hugged me. Not only did writng captivate me but I got the satisfying feeling of what live performance was like at age 11. Maybe that day a solo performer was born.

Q:  If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be?

A:  Wished Playwrights of color who don't have many grants or obies, or tonys could get a fair share of being produced and not shut out of the conversation. Bureaucracy is what I'd love to change. The politics of this hustle of being produced is what I wish we could change. It's a damn shame how politics play a huge part in how one gets produced but in the land of the blind the one eyed man is king. It sure would be nice if it were a level playing field. So if you don't come from a fancy MFA program they look at you like they are watching paint dry. That is a conversation that could take days to discuss so I'll leave it there.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A:  August Wilson. Ruben Santiago Hudson, Eugene O'Neil, Arthur Miller. David Henry Hwang, Liesl Tommy, Dominique Morriseau, Lynn Nottage, Stephen Adly Guirguis.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you?

A:  The kind that moves you. I could watch August Wilson plays nonstop. I really like new playwrights that challenge the status quo that really show you the humanity of folks people ignore. There is nothing more exhilarating than creating theater, art that challenges audiences to think, to look out of a window they are not looking out of. I love plays that put on the gloves and punch audiences in the gut with truth, the way a boxer fights in the ring. Theater possesses the potential to tell the truth. Playwrights from Odetts to Beckett, from O'Neill to August Wilson, from David Henry Hwang to Dominique Morriseau. Each bring a no BS authenticity to the stage and make audiences see the injustice as they root for the underdog. That's the kind of theater I want to be a part of. You can keep your BS theater for tourists on Broadway, I want theater that rocks peoples world, that challenges them to hear voices from people that have been marginalized. That's what I'm talking  about. I love that. That's the theater that NEEDS to be seen.

Q: What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  Writing is rewriting so keep writing. Find a place where you can develop find actors that you trust, create your own space and don't wait for any theater, or artistic director to validate you. Keep it moving keep it busy, stay inspired, write stories that resonate with your heart and keep getting up when you fall, rejection is not the end of the world if you love it embrace it and enjoy the f-g journey!

Q:  Plugs, please:

A:  Dishwasher Dreams
written and directed by:
Aladdin Ullah
Tabla accompaniment-Avi Sharma
Directed by Gabriel Vega Weissman
543 W 42nd Street
Playing till Nov. 18th.
more info:
http://www.dishwasherdreams.com/?fbclid=IwAR1xlnttrR6a3VVi1wjZ-hKNe_iRodCwvwzKkO1eIGdnfjsRgVN7dfpPi2g

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Nov 8, 2018

I Interview Playwrights Part 1016: Tyler English-Beckwith



Tyler English-Beckwith

Hometown: Dallas, Texas

Current Town: Brooklyn, NY

Q:  What are you working on now? 

A:  Currently working on the first draft of a new play called Young Mammy, and working on a project with Meow Wolf out of Santa Fe, NM.


Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A:  At my pre-school graduation, I was allowed to walk across the stage to celebrate my matriculation from the 3 year old class into the 4 year old class. I got my certificate and sat back down, but then I saw that the 5 year olds who were going to kindergarten got to give one-line speeches. I left my mother's side and demanded that the microphone be passed to me. I gave a speech that was much longer than the other speeches that were actually on the program. Then I bowed and got a standing ovation. When my mom tells the story she says that it was all gibberish, but I was very intentional with what I had to say. It was urgent to me. Whatever I said needed to be said immediately. In front of an audience.

Q:  If you could change one thing about theater, what would it be?

A:  Critics should be practitioners.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A:  Since she passed, I've been thinking about Ntozake Shange every day and the ways that she sacrificed her body. Also Karen Cogdill, Elly Lindsay, and Vickie Washington, my former teachers from Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. They laid the foundation for everything I've learned.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you?

A:  Theater that tells a truth you know but are afraid to speak out loud.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  I always think of this Octavia Butler nugget of truth. "First forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you're inspired or not. Habit will help you finish and polish your stories. Inspiration won't.  Habit is persistence in practice.

Q:  Plugs, please

A:  I can be found on New Play Exchange.

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Nov 7, 2018

I Interview Playwrights Part 1015: Rachel Bublitz



Rachel Bublitz

Hometown: San Diego, California

Current Town: Salt Lake City, Utah

Q:  What are you working on now?

A:  Right now I'm working on a play commissioned by the Egyptian Youtheatre about the first women to fly combat missions called Night Witches. They flew planes for Russia during World War 2 and were named the Night Witches by the Germans. Their planes were made out of wood and canvas, mostly, they flew every fifteen minutes at night, to keep the Germans from sleeping, and they'd often cut their engines before dropping their bombs so they wouldn't be heard by their enemy. A lot of them were under twenty years old, and since I think there's a lack of exciting TYA material out there, especially with great roles for young women, I think it's a perfect fit for high school and youth theaters. My ultimate plan is to have a triptych of historical plays about women set during WW 2, the first of which I've already written, about a spy named Nancy Wake (Once A Spy). Night Witches has me stepping outside of my comfort zone a lot, it incorporates a lot of movement and lyrical choral elements, which is both exciting and really terrifying... Like all good things!

Q:  Tell me about 31 plays in 31 days.

A:  After I wrote my first full-length play I realized that I had a lot of learning to do if I was going to do this as a profession. I thrive on crazy challenges and so I decided to write a play a day during the month of August (when my kids would both be in pre-school for the first time). I mentioned this to a playwright pal of mine, Tracy Held Potter, and she insisted that we make it a big thing and invite playwrights from around the world to join us. I thought she was totally crazy, I honestly didn't think anyone else would want to do it. And I was so, so wrong! 31 Plays in 31 Days has been going strong for SEVEN years now, and it still amazes me how many playwrights from all over the world still take on this huge challenge each year. It's now being run by the phenomenal Topher Cusumano who uses all his energize to excite hundreds and hundreds of playwrights to join him in this annual undertaking.

And, by the way, it worked for me. I haven't participated each year, but every time I do it stretches and pushes me as a writer and really strengthens my craft. I love it.

Q:  Tell me, if you will, a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a writer or as a person.

A:  This is kinda silly but I think it's mostly because I was alone a lot as a kid. I was a latch-key kid, and between school and when my mom got off I fended for myself. This typically took the form of my playing board games by myself, creating different characters who played against one another, playing tons of solitaire, since I'd assigned characteristics and back stories to all the face cards, so that each game involved a pretty epic fantasy to go along with how the cards fell, and tons of reading. My dad lived far away and sent strange books constantly. I read King Lear in sixth grade and loved it, but he also sent Grendel, In Watermelon Sugar, and lots and lots of Vonnegut.

Q:  Who are or were your theatrical heroes?

A:  Paula Vogel, Lynn Nottage, Marsha Norman, Quiara Alegría Hudes, Lorraine Hansbury, Dominique Morisseau, Anna Deavere Smith, Pam Gems, and Susan Glaspell, to name a few.

Q:  What kind of theater excites you?

A:  I like theater that makes me laugh and cry, that puts me in another person's shoes, that pushes and makes me question my own values. I like messy and complicated characters and stories that don't have easy (or any) answers. I think right now we're all being shoved so hard into separate and very specific boxes, I'm most excited about theater that takes people out of those box and reminds us that above everything else we're all human.

Q:  What advice do you have for playwrights just starting out?

A:  Read and write a lot. See lots of theater, even bad theater, maybe especially bad theater... It helps you develop your own taste and you can start the fun experiment of how you'd fix it (after you've left the show, of course!). Read for a theater, I read for Berkeley Rep for a few years, I earned free tickets and had tons of brand new plays at my finger tips. Let your writing be bad, trust in your craft and in process, we draft for a reason. I'm not a write-every-day type, but I do think structure is key. To writing and writing habits. Oh, and read, read, read!! Get on New Play Exchange, it's the best investment EVER for anyone interested in new plays. And after you put up some of your work, read plays from other playwrights.

Q:  Plugs, please:

A:  I've been lucky enough this year to have at least one public performance in every month! Happening right now in November I have two plays in the Utah New Works Festival, Employee of the Month as a full production, and The Garden as a reading. My play Mom's Ham will also be produced in San Diego with Clairemont Act One Community Theater.

In December I have a workshop of Mom's Ham with Phoenix Theatre Ensemble and a developmental reading of my play Ripped with Athena Theatre, both in New York City.

And I have tons of work up on my New Play Exchange page here: https://newplayexchange.org/users/275/rachel-bublitz

And my website: https://rachelbublitz.com/

Also, in case any of your readers teach high school or college and are looking for material, I have another TYA play that I'm looking for a second production of right now, a super fun and glittery full length called Cheerleaders VS. Aliens, which is up on my New Play Exchange page.

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